History Education Research Journal [HERJ]

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Aims and Scope
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Editors

Latest Issue

HERJ volume 16.2

Greek history education research + General articles

To mark the introduction of a new history curriculum in Greece, this issue of HERJ includes a number of articles on Greek history education research, collected and introduced by George Kokkinos.

CONTENTS

Editorial

• Jon NICHOL & Hilary COOPER – Editorial. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.01

Greek history education research

• George KOKKINOS
A report on Greek history education. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.02

• Kostas KASVIKIS & Georgia KOUSERI
Antiquity revisited: Challenges and opportunities in the creation of the new Greek history curriculum. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.03

• Lukas PERIKLEOUS
‘Because they believed’: Students’ ideas of historical empathy in Greek Cypriot primary education. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.04

• Vasileios KOSMAS
Student responses to differing accounts of a controversial historical issue: 15-year-old Greek students consider the removal of children in the Greek Civil War. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.05

• Maria VLACHAKI, George KOKKINOS & Zeta PAPANDREOU
Approaching mythology in the history curriculum of compulsory education in Greece. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.06

General articles

• Patrik JOHANSSON
Historical enquiry in primary school: Teaching interpretation of archaeological artefacts from an intercultural perspective. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.07

• David-Alexandre WAGNER
Critical thinking and use of film in Norwegian lower secondary history classrooms. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.08

• Matti RAUTIAINEN, Eija RÄIKKÖNEN, Anna VEIJOLA & Simo MIKKONEN
History teaching in Finnish general upper secondary schools: Objectives and practices. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.09

• Fredrik Leonard ALVÉN
Bias in teachers’ assessments of students’ historical narratives. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.10

• Laura ARIAS-FERRER & Alejandro EGEA-VIVANCOS
Who changes the course of history? Historical agency in the narratives of Spanish pre-service primary teachers. doi.org/10.18546/HERJ.16.2.11